Meet Lizbeth from Paullett Golden’s The Earl and the Enchantress

Thank you for doing this.  Because you lost your mother at a very young age and your father raised you to be self-sufficient you expect to be respected within any relationship. Valuing independence, there is the expectation of being treated as an equal. It appears you have basically given up on marriage. Then you met Sebastian Lancaster, the Earl of Roddam who has a lot in common with you.  Both of you are witty intellectuals who value a good conversation along with the passion. Even though the 1790s has strict courtship rules you and Sebastian seem to formulate your own guidelines.  I am intrigued by your headstrong personality and philosophies. 

Elise Cooper: How did you become such an independent woman?

Lizbeth Trethow:Am I? I wouldn’t consider myself independent, but I appreciate the sentiment and that you would view me as such a woman. Independence, to my understanding of your meaning, is a state of mind. I’ve freed myself from the chains of ignorance and the expectations of Society. While I don’t wish to be speak ill of my sex, I will say too many women readily accept their dependence. They depend on the views of others, the gossip mill, the supposed truths in the news columns, the mandates of family, the rules of tradition and propriety, and, oh, the list does go on. Whereas, I depend on no one but myself. I’ve made the choice to educate my mind, which has thus liberated my soul. I’m not so conceited as to call myself enlightened, but I do feel independence comes from being enlightened, and that is the very state of mind in which I would like to be. 

EC: People describe you as intelligent, poised, a teaser, opinionated, candid, headstrong, and a competitor.  Fair?

LT:Oh my! *laughs* Is that what they say? People do talk, don’t they? I’m not certain we can be so classified into neat and tidy little descriptors. I might consider myself an intelligent woman, but by whose standards? If I should be compared to Socrates, would I still be considered intelligent? I know nothing of farming, and yet the farmer works such miracles with his bare hands. Would he not be considered intelligent, and I ignorant in comparison? I am flattered by your depiction of me, but I’m not sure I would see myself in those same terms. 

EC: So, how would you describe yourself?

LT:I’m determined and decisive, but does that also imply I’m headstrong? I don’t care to be proven wrong. But, when I know I am right, does that imply I’m opinionated and competitive? I wonder, could someone be both candid and a tease? If this is how you see me, then I can’t argue with or alter your view because it’s your perception of me, and thus by your own standards, it’s true. I may see someone as crass while someone else sees the person as candid. Neither of us is wrong. We merely have different perceptions of the same person. I do thank you for thinking of me enough to form an opinion, and I am truly flattered. 

EC: What are your favourite books and why?

LT:Choosing a favourite book is not unlike choosing a favourite child. They’re each so different but equally loved. I do enjoy social commentary with a creative flair. A book that pulls me in with a clever story while also reflecting on the world at large is what I would prefer to read over something strictly academic or purely fictionalized for the sake of entertainment. For example, Gulliver’s Travelsperfectly marries both academic observation and speculation with entertainment. Swift is a keen observer and sceptic. I certainly don’t agree with all his observations, but he does make me think while tickling my humour. Have you heard of Blake? His poems embody that very marriage I mentioned. His words are akin to music, yet he verses about harsh realities. I do hope he gains notoriety soon for people need to hear what he has to say. As a final note, should you have the time and wish to understand me, you should, perhaps, consider reading Condorcet. I’ll nudge you in his direction and allow you to make your own judgments. 

EC:  Thanks, when I get the time I will look into it.  Let’s go off in another direction. Do you think it is wishful thinking to want a marriage based on love, respect, and admiration?  

LT:Some may believe it is highly improbable, not to mention unrealistic, but I’ll settle for nothing less. I’ve seen how a marriage based on love, respect, and admiration can be, and should others see that, as well, they would change their perspective. It is difficult for people to understand what they’ve not experienced. So many children are raised by wet nurses, nannies, and then governesses, seeing their sires on the rare occasion. They grow up knowing nothing but hierarchy and isolation. Why should they, then, expect or even want love, respect, and admiration? 

EC:  It sounds like you have someone in mind?

LT:My parents were outliers in this world. They married for love, they respected each other as equals, and they admired each other’s individuality. I’ve seen how harmonious this is. I’ve also seen how such love can destroy, for the loss of my mother nearly destroyed my father. Does that suggest he shouldn’t have loved so deeply? If he had married for duty alone, someone of his own class rather than a tin mine owner’s daughter, he wouldn’t have suffered such depths of despair at my mother’s death, but would he be better for it? I believe the time they had together was worth every minute, and that is a love worth living for, despite the consequences. I don’t think it realistic we all find our soul’s counterpart, so we must be prepared to hold strong and not settle or sacrifice our self-worth in the absence of that counterpart.  

EC:  So, you are willing to be a spinster?

LT:The word has such negative connotations. One looks at a spinster like an old shoe with a broken heel. I prefer to think of myself as a free agent. I answer to no one. How freeing is that? There is nothing wrong or damning about being free. Is it the unmarried who consider themselves spinsters or those who are married? Yes, you have it, the ones who are already married look to the unmarried and point a finger—you there, you’re an aging spinster. They take the position of superiority as though having a spouse lifts them to some grand throne. Does it? What have they gained? They are, more of them than not, unhappy. Perhaps they point to the unmarried with disparaging remarks because they are envious of the freedom but don’t want anyone to catch on. I’m proud to be a free agent! This is not a position of shame. 

EC:  You were overheard saying that you will never be married if it means you will be controlled by a husband?

LT:I did say that, yes, though you’re naughty for eavesdropping. There is no denying women are the property of their husbands. It is the written law, after all. A husband who now has control over her person, her mind, and all legal rights. Should he wish to punish her with his hand, he may do so, by law. Should he wish to lock her in a room and starve her of food, he may do so, by law. Should he wish to starve her of affection, he may do so, by law. How is this not control? Women are no different than slaves. They are purchased for the purpose of breeding. I generalize, for not all marriages are such as this, but the tone of the marriage is determined by the husband. Suppose he loves the wife at the beginning but then bores of her? He also controls the tone of the relationship. Marriage is nothing more than a binding contract unless there is passion, respect, love, and equality. 

EC: How would you describe Sebastian? Do you know him better than himself?

LT:I wouldn’t flatter myself to know him better than he knows himself, but often it takes someone else looking in to see the larger context. We can’t always see our own faults or our strengths so well as someone else can see them. Sebastian struggles with understanding himself. He’s been told for so long that he’s unlovable and monstrous that he’s accepted that identity. It is no different than a girl being told her entire life that she’s too plain. Why should she ever suspect herself to be anything but plain, much less beautiful? I see Sebastian as a compassionate, driven, and clever man. There is no problem he can’t solve. There is no trench he can’t dig. If he sets his mind to it, nothing will stop him. He has a fathoms deep capacity for love. If only he could love himself. 

EC: Do you think Sebastian is overly influenced by King Arthur?

LT:Nonsense. Sebastian has a great many interests and influencing figures. He studies legends, myths, and histories to gain a sense of how to become a better person. His interest in Greek and Roman mythology is nearly as strong in his interest of England’s former kings. Most young boys have an older brother they can idolize or a father they can learn from, but Sebastian had neither. He saw King Arthur not only as a father-figure, but also as a person to emulate. When he needed direction in life, he turned to someone he could respect, and who better than a king? Let us be happy he chose King Arthur instead of Gaius Caligula. 

EC: What do you see as the important qualities in a relationship?

LT:The important qualities would vary from person to person. My sister, for instance, wouldn’t value the same qualities as I would. She would never suit with an intellectual, much less a recluse. I, however, neither enjoy the company of Society nor the company of a dull wit. I value those from whom I can learn. It would never be any fun if we agreed with each other all the time, but it would be arduous if we were too contentious. I want to learn from someone as much as I’d hope they could learn from me. If we both bring something to the relationship, we meet as equals. The qualities important to me for any kind of relationship, be it friendship or beyond, are communication, respect, conversation, intellect, and equality. 

EC:  Are you looking for a kindred spirit?

LT:I wouldn’t admit to looking for anyone, but I would expect, for there to be a successful and happy marriage with someone, the person would need to understand me on a far deeper level than anyone else could. This understanding is more than recognizing what my interests are. It’s the realization of why those interests are important to me. Should the person intuitively know what I would like or dislike, enjoy or not enjoy, value or not value, that is a true and deep understanding, and that is the only relationship that would work for me. Nothing surface level will work. 

EC: Do you think you are alike or different from your younger sister Charlotte?

LT:Oh, vastly different! It is a wonder we’re related at all when one examines our personalities. Charlotte is orderly, while I’m quite messy. Charlotte enjoys socials and tea parties, while I enjoy solitude and reading. Charlotte would prefer to dance, while I would rather run. Charlotte cares far too much about Society’s opinion and wants to be seen as the perfect lady, while I couldn’t give a fig for what anyone thinks of me. That isn’t to say we don’t have common traits, as well, and we do share a sisterly affection stronger than I believe most do, but we’ve never shared opinions or interests. She is far too much like our aunt, and I am far too much like our mother. We would, as sisters should, do anything for each other. I would lay down my life for her, as she would do for me, for we share a familial bond nothing can sever. That doesn’t stop us from bickering daily as we’re wont to do!

EC: How did the death of your mother affect you?

LT:To be honest, it took years to sink it. I felt the loss at once, but I had no time in which to examine it. She was my best friend. Yet, before I could understand the impact, my family fell apart. Papa couldn’t handle the loss, and my sister hadn’t a mother. I knew if I didn’t swallow my heartbreak and do something, I would lose more than my mother. I look back and think how silly it was for me to think I had any impact at all, for I was only a little girl, but at the time, I didn’t feel so little, no one treated me as though I were little, and I shouldered weights far heftier than a little girl could or should carry. I was a little woman in the body of a young girl, and I was so focused on caring for my family I had no time in which to mourn. By the time I could mourn, it was as though looking back from the eyes of a different person. I believe it was for the best. However much I didn’t understand the concept of death at that age, I do know if I’d stopped to think for too long how hurt I was not to see Mama ever again, I might have been as lost as Papa. She was a vibrant woman whose smile lit an entire room. How does a child cope with that loss? I didn’t. I pushed it down until I could look on it objectively. 

EC: Were you attracted to Sebastian because you have that in common with him?

LT:I hadn’t thought of that. Hmm. I wouldn’t say his losing his mother was something that made him attractive. Our commonalities are numerous, and it is something we share, but I believe it only helps us to understand each other. It is the understanding of each other that is attractive, not necessarily the cause of the understanding. When I heard of his loss, I will say I wanted to wrap my arms around him and hold him, not as a lover or a friend, but as a mother. I wanted to rest his head on my shoulder and hold him so he would know he was protected and loved, just as my mother did for me. My heart went out to the little boy inside of him who had lost his only friend. For me, I lost my best friend, but not my only friend. He lost his only friend.

EC: Do you think Sebastian is able to understand the importance of family and how to love?

LT:I believe he knows what he wants and has always wanted, but I do think he’s afraid he won’t know how. He admitted as much to me. He’s afraid he’ll become his father. There’s no shame in such fear, but as he becomes more himself, he’ll let it go. He only holds onto such a fear because he’s still learning who he is outside of what others have told him. As I mentioned earlier in this conversation, he has such a deep capacity for love and is so compassionate, I know in my heart he will be the best father and husband a woman could ever ask for, but I don’t think he yet knows that about himself. He will. Give him time. 

EC: Do the best relationships start out as friendships?

LT:I believe I loved Sebastian before I saw him as a friend, but who can say which emotion came first. I respected him, and that was the basis on which we built a future. If you cannot befriend a spouse, before or after seeing them as a partner, then what remains when passion fades or times are rough? Not all friendships should be relationships, but all relationships should be friendships. At least from my estimation. If you cannot respect them as a friend, how can you possibly love them? 

EC: Can a man and a woman ever be just friends?

LT:They are more likely to be friends than anything else. Passion and love are rare. Passion, especially, is so often fleeting, and love must be there to sustain when passion runs its course. I’ve seen many friendships, but I’ve only rarely seen passion. Friendship does not guarantee a good match, nor does it guarantee love or passion, but it should be the foundation of the relationship. It may, in most cases, simply be friendship. I have many close friends, some of which are male, and none of which I’ve felt remotely attracted to beyond friendship. Take my cousin Walter as an example. We are good friends, and I enjoy time with him and conversation. I would go to great lengths to help him if he needed me, but I’ve never harboured romantic feelings for him. I do love him, but as family, nothing more. 

EC: Why do you love the sea so much?

LT:There’s a raw power to the sea that is underestimated, as well as a magic that is misunderstood. I remember one time when I was little, standing at the edge of the water with Mama, thinking how big the world was and how small I was. My personal world consisted only of a few miles, yet when I stood at the water’s edge, I could see on to forever nothing but blue water. It was humbling but awe-inspiring. The ocean seemed to me the largest and most powerful element on earth. It had the power to wreck ships, carry pirates, and drown swimmers, but it harvests life and beauty. When I let the water lap over my feet that day, I felt connected. Where had those same droplets been that were now touching my feet? Where would they go next, carrying the essence of me? 

EC: What do you like doing for fun?

LT:Oh, there are a great many diversions I enjoy! Learning and reading, of course, so that I might live vicariously through the minds of scientists, adventurers, and philosophers. I love the outdoors, the warmth of the sun, the whisper of the wind, the smell of nature. Wilderness walks are a favourite pastime of mine, especially walks that turn into explorations. I would never turn down a swim, be it in a pond or ocean. I may not like a crowd or socializing, but I do enjoy good company, so calling on friends is always pleasant. Sebastian has promised to teach me about the stars and how to use his telescope, so in time, perhaps that will be a new interest of mine. 

EC: What are your hopes and dreams?

LT:I share Sebastian’s desire for a large family. I want to be the kind of mother I remember my own Mama being. I envision sharing with Sebastian his dreams, as well, for he has such grand plans for his lands, and I want to do what I can to help. I do hope to become good friends with his sister Lilith, and if I have my druthers, she’ll move in with us before long. Befriending the tenantry and laborers is important to me, and I hope to strengthen the connections for all his properties by creating a familial relationship with everyone in our care. I don’t like to be idle and always want a sense of purpose, a sense of utility and usefulness. I want always to be helping someone or achieving something. I do believe the land will keep us busy as we rebuild and build out, creating more homes, larger towns, more positions.

EC: If you have a crystal ball what would your life be like in five years?

LT:Oh, what a blasphemous question! Crystal balls indeed. I do believe I like how you think, Elise. May I call you Elise? How presumptuous of me. I feel we’ve become such good friends during this conversation. If given the opportunity to look into a crystal ball, I would look away, for I want the adventure and the surprise! It’s no fun knowing what will happen. And should I make plans, would I then be disappointed if they didn’t come true? I will be happy with whatever life brings me. I would imagine, given my current direction, that in five years, we will have expanded the towns of all his properties, have at least three children, be rich as Croesus, and be as happy as larks. I won’t be disappointed if we’re poor as paupers and childless, as long as we’re together, but wouldn’t it be lovely to think the best? 

THANK YOU!!

Paullett Golden is a lover of the fairy tale historical romance and has launched herself into a writing career. She’s been writing historical romances since an early age and has been a professor of writing for two decades. She divides her time between Texas and Northumberland, England.

Let’s Welcome Winifred (Freddie) Guilford from Freddie-Guilford Crossing Brides by Margaret Tanner

Freddie front coverHer background:

Parents: Sam Guilford (father) Mother dead

Siblings: Billy (brother). Sisters: Alfreda (Alfie) and Alexandra (Alex)

Places lived: Guilford Crossing – Texas

Jobs: Riding shotgun on a freight wagon for my father.

Friends: Lily and Matt Brayshaw.

Enemies: Outlaw gang

Let’s Get into some questions now. What, if anything, would you like to change about your life? I would like to be treated as a female and not as a male.

How are you viewed by others? As a female doing the work of a man.

How would you describe yourself? Hardworking, compassionate and fearless.

How much self-control do you have? Not much, I am hot tempered.

Any talents? Excellent shot.

What would a great gift for you be? A pretty gown.

What makes you sad? Seeing my brother the way he is.

Hopes and dreams? To have a husband and children.

What’s the worst thing you have ever done to someone and why? I killed a man

Biggest trauma: Being attacked and left for dead by outlaws.

What do you like best about the other main characters in your book? Their courage.

What do you like least about the other main characters in your book? My father is a bully.

Most embarrassing thing that ever happened to you: Having the hero, Nick, taking off my ripped, blood stained clothes to treat my injuries.

FREDDIE – GUILFORD CROSSING BRIDES – BOOK 2: A catastrophic event delivers Winifred (Freddie) Guilford, into the arms of reclusive rancher Nicholas Brown. Brought up by a tyrannical father, Freddie and her sisters dress and work like men. Nicholas is a suspicious loner who shuns people. Will their chance of finding happiness together be ruined by events from the past?

Purchase it now on Amazon or read it for free in KU.

margaret authorMargaret Tanner is an award winning, multi-published Australian author, who writes Contemporary Romance, Historical Romance, and Western Romance with a small dose of sizzle.

She loves delving into the pages of history as she carries out research for her historical novels. No book is too old or tattered for her to trawl through, no museum too dusty, or website too hard to navigate. Many of her novels have been inspired by true events, with one being written around the hardships and triumphs of her pioneering ancestors in frontier Australia. She once spent a couple of hours in an old goal cell so she could feel the chilling cold and fear

With the encouragement of friend and Western Romance author, Susan Horsnell, she has now fallen in love with writing Western Historical novellas, and found it an easy transition. Frontier Australia and frontier America, have many similarities –  isolated communities living in a harsh, unforgiving environment, a large single male population, and a lack of marriageable women.

Her stories are drama laden. Her heroes hide behind a rough exterior. They are tough men who are prepared to face danger and overwhelming odds for the women they love. Her heroines are brave, resourceful women willing to endure hardship and danger in an untamed land, if it means they can win the heart of the men they love.

Margaret is married and has three grown up sons, and two gorgeous little granddaughters. Outside of her family and friends, writing is her passion.

Web Page: http://www.margarettanner.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/margaret.tanner.399

Follow Margaret on Book Bub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/margaret-tanner

 

 

Interview with Adam from Promised to a Soldier and Courted by a Soldier by Jenna Brandt

preorderNovel PASTimes: If you were sent to a deserted island what three things would you take?

Adam: My Bible, a pocket knife, and a letter from Karen.

Novel PASTimes: Do you have a hidden talent?

Adam: I’m great at blending in and getting people to trust me. I guess it comes with the territory, being a former spy.

Novel PASTimes: Do you have a habit you wish you could break?

Adam: Not trusting people. Because of my training, I tend to always suspect people have hidden motives for their actions.

Novel PASTimes: What features do you like the most about yourself?

Adam: I’m loyal and I’ll do whatever it takes to protect the people I love.

Novel PASTimes: What feature do you dislike the most about yourself?

Adam: *averts his eyes* I wish I could change my choices when I was young. I let people manipulate me into doing their bidding even though I should have objected to what they wanted me to do.

Novel PASTimes: Do you have a hobby?

Adam: I like to work with my hands. I built an entire farmhouse for Karen and I to live in once we were married.

Novel PASTimes: What is your biggest pet peeve?

Adam: I hate when people get involved in a situation which is none of their business.

Novel PASTimes: What is your favorite food?

Adam: I’m partial to anything Karen cooks or bakes. *a giant grin forms on his mouth* I especially love her “Apple Brown Betty.”

Novel PASTimes: Tell me something no one else knows about you?

Adam: I was a spy and was trained to infiltrate and deceive. I hurt a lot of people in the line of duty and I wish I could take it back. I try to make up for what I did every day by being a good person and helping others in Rockwood Springs.

Novel PASTimes: If I asked you to write an entry in your journal what would it be about?

Adam: I’ve been trained not to write anything down. I keep everything up here. *taps the side of head* 

Novel PASTimes: What is your idea of a perfect day?

Adam: I love picnicking with the Webber Family in the surrounding meadows in Rockwood Springs.

Get Promised by a Soldier on Amazon: Before America entered the Great War, Clara and Adam were set to be married but everything was put on hold when Adam was conscripted to join the military. Clara, along with her family, wait in Rockwood Springs, Texas, for the safe return of the soldier they all love. After being forced to return to a life Adam tried to leave behind, he is taken prisoner. What keeps him alive is the thought of returning to his true love, Clara. Though miraculously rescued, Adam must come to terms with what happened to him while captive. After his return, the couple must face new obstacles to find their happily-ever-after

Get Courted by a Soldier on Amazon: Elizabeth Reed is best friends with Clara Webber and has grown up around her brother Garrett. Recently, an attraction has surfaced between the friends, but as the new relationship starts to form, problems caused by the Great War and its aftermath, have reached a boiling point for the Reed family, leaving little room for Elizabeth to focus on love. Garrett wants to be a soldier and fight in the Great War, but his family is against him joining the military. The only thing he wants more that serving with honor is to marry Elizabeth Reed, but their relationship can’t progress with her father refusing to let them be together. Frustrated, Garrett makes a hasty decision that will change all their lives forever. Will the Great War destroy the future the couple hopes to plan together?

Jenna Brandt’s website: www.jennabrandt.com

Her books on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Jenna-Brandt/e/B0711MSFXW/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1497269877&sr=8-1

Like her on Facebook www.facebook.com/JennaBrandtAuthor

Follow her on Twitter www.twitter.com/JennaDBrandt

Stalk her on Instagram www.instagram.com/jennnathewriter/

Pin her on Pinterest www.pinterest.com/jennnathewriter/books-blogs-and-writers/

Look her up on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16847426.Jenna_Brandt

Check her out on Bookbub https://www.bookbub.com/profile/jenna-brandt

IMG_2568

Jenna Brandt is a Christian historical fiction author and her books span from the Victorian to Western to WWI eras with elements of romance, suspense and faith. Her debut book, The English Proposal, released in May 2017 and it is the first book in her series, The Window to the Heart Saga. Book 2, The French Encounter released in June 2017, the third in the series, The American Conquest, released in July 2017, the fourth book, The Oregon Pursuit, released in October 2017 and her novella, The Christmas Bride, from the same series, is set to release in the Christmas anthology, Under the Mistletoe.

She has been an avid reader since she could hold a book and started writing stories almost as early. She has been published in several newspapers as well as edited for multiple papers. She graduated with her Bachelor of Arts in English from Bethany College and was the Editor-in-Chief of the newspaper while there. She’s an on-going contributor for The Mighty Website and her first blog was published on Yahoo Parenting and The Grief Toolbox as well as featured on the ABC News and Good Morning America websites.

Writing is her passion, but she also enjoys cooking, watching movies, reading, engaging in social media and spending time with her three young daughters and husband where they live in the Central Valley of California. She is also active in her local church where she volunteers on their first impressions team as well as writes for the church’s creative team.

 

 

Talking with Isaiah Hayes from Lawfully Promised by Elle E. Kay

51mz1EQJzBLIf you had a free day with no responsibilities and your only mission was to enjoy yourself, what would you do? I would spend my free day outside. I might visit the local hot springs, or if the weather was warm, I might go fishing and wade in the creek. I love the water.

What impression do you make on people when they first meet you? I can come across as intense. I’ve also been accused of ‘playing God’ by trying to fix other people’s problems.

What’s your idea of a good marriage? A good marriage is what my parents had: two people who loved each other so much that their struggles seemed minor compared to their feelings for each other.

What are you most proud of about your life? I’m proud of joining the Texas Rangers. It was a big risk to come to an unfamiliar state and settle here, but a bigger risk to join the Rangers knowing how dangerous the job was. I decided that the risk was worth it to help save others.

What are you most ashamed of in your life? Envy. I was always envious of my older brother, Nate. An exceptional bounty-hunter, he made a name for himself before I moved away. I was jealous and wanted to be like him, but in a way that was what drove me to move away and join the rangers, so although I regret the negative feelings, I’m glad I made the choices I did.

What do you believe about God? I believe that God is good. He has plans to help me thrive, but sometimes I thwart His plans, by asserting my own will where His belongs.

Is there anything you’ve always wanted to do but haven’t done? I’ve always wanted to see the ocean. Now that I live in Austin, I’m only 200 miles from the Gulf of Mexico, so maybe someday soon I’ll get to visit.

What’s the worst thing that’s happened in your life? What did you learn from it? My mother dying. I learned that grief is a hard thing and it consumed my father for a long time before he accepted it. We knew that my mother was with Jesus and that helped all of us deal with her death, but living without her was a huge challenge. Our housekeeper, Rosa, helped us all through our grief. She was like a second mother.

Tell me about your best friend. My best-friend died recently. He was murdered by outlaws while investigating an incident that happened at Olive Ranch. Bose was a good man. Taught me a great deal of what I know. He was a deputy-sheriff in Lee County.

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever done to someone? Why? Killed them. It’s hard to take a life when you don’t think their soul is going to rest in peace. It’s a somber thing to have to do, but sometimes there is no better option.

What would you like it to say on your tombstone? I hope it will say I was a husband and father who lived my life for the Lord Jesus Christ.

Describe your ideal mate. She’ll be kind and gentle. If I’m extra lucky, she’ll be a good cook. If I’m truly blessed, she’ll love God as much as I do.

What are you most afraid of? Death. Not my own, but the death of my loved ones. I’ve lost my mother and my best friend, and I got through it, but I hope I don’t lose anyone else close to me any time soon.

What do you like best about yourself? Least? They sort of go together. What is best about me in some situations can be the worst in others. I’ll do anything for a friend, and usually that’s good, but sometimes it can be thing I like least since I sometimes allow others to take advantage of me.

What do you like best and least about the other characters in your book? Well, I like Ella’s kind heart and sweet disposition, but I hate her fear. I wish I could take it away. Her father sounds like he was good when she was younger, but I can’t see past my hatred of what he’s done to her to understand her love for him.

As for the sheriff, he’s a good man, but he overlooks the flaws in his new deputies. I find that aggravating.

And Clara, well, I have nothing but good things to say about her. I couldn’t ask for a better a friend.

Lawfully Promised: When Ella Jamison’s father gets in trouble with the law, he offers up his only daughter to get the Texas ranger on his trail to look the other way. Fear over what might become of her father if arrested obligates Ella to go along with his plan.
Isaiah Hayes doesn’t accept bribes, but his concern for Miss Jamison, should he leave her to Mr. Jamison’s abuse, compels Isaiah to accept the offer. While investigating the Christmas Eve hangings and Christmas Day Massacre, Isaiah tries to make Ella comfortable in his meager dwelling. Ella battles her fears as she tries to adjust to a new home with a man she fears, almost as much as the father who gave her away. Promises are made to broken, aren’t they? Purchase Lawfully Promised on Amazon or read it for free in KU. 

81d1BxMwkXL._US230_Elle E. Kay lives in the Back Mountain area of Pennsylvania. She loves life in the country on her little farmette. She lives with her loving husband, Joe; her only son, Ian; her dog, Sammy; her goats, sheep, rabbits, chickens, turkey, pheasants and guineas.

Elle is a born-again christian with a deep faith and love for the Lord Jesus Christ. She desires to learn how to live for Him and to put Him first. She writes children’s books under the name Ellie Mae Kay.

Visit Elle on her website: https://www.elleekay.com

Elle on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ElleEKay7/

Elle on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ElleEKay7

Elle’s books on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Elle-E.-Kay/e/B01C0TI9J2%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

All About Lark MacDougall from Laura Frantz’s A Bound Heart

Frant_A Bound Heart_Cover

Name: Lark MacDougall

Parents: Deceased

Siblings: None

Places lived: Isle of Kerrera, Scotland & Colonial Virginia

Jobs: Stillroom mistress and beekeeper

Friends: Magnus MacLeish, childhood friend and laird of Kerrera Castle

Enemies: Though I hate to say it, I’m not fond of the laird’s wife, Lady Isla, or her maid

Dating, marriage: I seem to be doing things a wee bit tapsalteerie as we Scots say, with a baby first, then a courtship…

Children: An adopted son, Larkin. “She took the infant, going wide-eyed at his weight. A ruadh-headed handful he was. He gave a chortle of delight, and the knot of women looked relieved, spared of his fretfulness. His dimpled hand brushed Lark’s flushed cheek, his bright eyes on her face.”

What person do you most admire? The laird of Kerrera Castle

Overall outlook on life: Life is hard, but God is faithful

Do you like yourself? Somedays

What, if anything, would you like to change about your life? I would see justice served

How are you viewed by others? Capable

Physical appearance: Tall and spare

Eyes: Blue

Hair: the hue of a maple leaf in autumn

Voice: A bit low for a woman

Right- or left-handed? Right

How would you describe yourself? Full of flaws but trying to be better

Characteristics: Fortitude, Kindness, Compassion

Strongest/weakest character traits: Endurance/nostalgia

How much self-control do you have? Enough to not run after the laird 😉

Fears: Leaving my beloved island

Collections, talents: Mistress of the bees and stillroom

What people like best about you: My compassion

Interests and favorites: A hankering for books and a bit o’ jewelry

Food, drink: My granny’s bannocks and a cup o’ tea

Books: The Bible and Watt’s Hymnal

Best way to spend a weekend: Baking scones and drinking tea

What would a great gift for you be? Seeing someone else made happy

When are you happy? When I’m with the folks I love

What makes you angry? Injustice

What makes you sad? Slavery, poverty, disease

What makes you laugh? Wee ones

Hopes and dreams: Returning to Kerrera Castle

What’s the worst thing you have ever done to someone and why? I snitched a sweet from the castle kitchen

Greatest success: Marrying my love

Biggest trauma: Being condemned of a crime

What do you care about most in the world? Faith

Do you have a secret? Nay

What do you like best about the other main characters in your book? I adore the laird and Larkin

What do you like least about the other main characters in your book? Lady Isla and her maid are/were a thorn to me

If you could do one thing and succeed at it, what would it be: Overturn the corrupt court system and see justice reign

Most embarrassing thing that ever happened to you: Being on trial after being in gaol (jail)

Thanks for introducing yourself to us, Lark!

Laura Frantz is a Christy Award finalist and the ECPA bestselling author of severalFrantz_Laura books, including The Frontiersman’s Daughter, Courting Morrow Little, The Colonel’s Lady, and The Lacemaker. She lives and writes in a log cabin in the heart of Kentucky. Learn more at www.laurafrantz.net.

Meet Elizabeth from We Hope for Better Things by Erin Bartels

Today we welcome Elizabeth Balsam who answered a few questions for curious readers!

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Parents: Bruce and Marjorie

Siblings: Grace

Places lived: Detroit, Michigan

Jobs: Journalist at the Detroit Free Press

Friends: Desiree? She’s the closest thing I have to a friend at the moment, busy as I am with work.

Enemies: Anyone who gets in the way of me getting the story. Often, that takes the form of one Roger Bristol, my own personal nemesis at the Free Presswho is always trying to undermine me and steal my stories.

Dating, marriage: I’m far too busy for such things.

Children: none

What person do you most admire? Nellie Bly, the great investigative journalist of the late 19thcentury, who went undercover as an inmate at an insane asylum for an exposé for Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World. She also circumnavigated the globe in 72 days to be the first person, man or woman, to turn the fiction of Jules Verne’s Around the World in 80 Daysinto fact.

Overall outlook on life: My time as a journalist has me believing that we’re all just trying to survive as best we can in a corrupt and chaotic world.

Do you like yourself? I guess I like myself as well as anyone. But because I am always pushing toward the next goal, I can’t help but feel like I’m always falling a little short of my expectations of myself.

What, if anything, would you like to change about your life? Honestly, I wouldn’t mind being able to step back and take a breather once in a while, but if I did, who would pick up the slack?

How are you viewed by others? Driven, focused, go-getter.

Physical appearance: I’m a professional and I’m serious about being taken seriously. And that means slacks, blouses, and sensible shoes.

Eyes: Blue

Hair: Brown

Voice: Gets the job done.

Right- or left-handed? Right-handed.

How would you describe yourself? I’m a public servant. I’m passionate about my work and I feel that every article I turn in has the potential to improve the lives of my fellow Detroiters because I am exposing corruption, neglect, and injustice.

Strongest/weakest character traits: My greatest strength is my dogged determination to get the story. My greatest weakness is that I actively avoid creating personal connections with people, leaving me too often alone and lonely.

How much self-control do you have? My family prides itself on having mastery over our emotions, so the few times I haven’t succeeded in that are a source of embarrassment to me.

Fears: My greatest fear is being inconsequential.

Collections, talents: The only thing I collect is bylines. My talent is writing about the truth I’ve dug up.

What people like best about you: I think my readers appreciate the fact that I don’t hold back and that no one is off-limits when it comes to exposing injustice or corruption.

Interests and favorites: I’m always in the mood to watch All the President’s Men, The Post, or Spotlight.

Food, drink: Detroit style coney dogs, please and thank you

Books: I read a lot of nonfiction, looking for historical facts and connections to what’s going on in today’s world. Anything to build my knowledge base.

Best way to spend a weekend: In the library, digging up evidence.

What would a great gift for you be? A new laptop because I beat mine up so badly schlepping it around town.

When are you happy? Every time I see my name on the front page.

What makes you angry? When I interview people that have been taken advantage of or failed by the system.

What makes you sad? The fact that I can’t do more to help the people in my city.

What makes you laugh? Seeing the bad guys get what’s coming to them, which unfortunately seems to happen more in movies than in real life.

Hopes and dreams: Someday, I want to win a Pulitzer for my investigative journalism.

What’s the worst thing you have ever done to someone and why?

Greatest success: Raising enough awareness and outrage through my writing that Detroiters were able to pressure city officials to take action on 11,000 untested rape kits, leading to the identification and arrests of hundreds of serial rapists in Detroit.

Biggest trauma: My parents leaving Detroit to go back to the mission field in Brazil. Oh, and getting fired from my job…

What does you care about most in the world? Justice being done.

Do you have a secret? Outwardly I put on a good show of being self-sufficient, but inside I am starved for family and love.

If you could do one thing and succeed at it, what would it be: Right now, all of my energy is focused on getting the goods on Judge Ryan Sharpe’s time in the National Guard during the Detroit Riots of 1967. If I can prove his involvement in a particular shootout, I’ll be able to complete my investigative series on the riot and establish myself as the top investigative journalist at the Free Press. Oh, and being able to rub it in Roger Bristol’s face wouldn’t be half bad either.

Thank you, Elizabeth! It was great to meet you!

***

Erin Bartels has been a publishing professional for more than fifteen years. Her short story “This Elegant Ruin” was a finalist in the Saturday Evening Post 2014 Great American Fiction Contest. A freelance writer and editor, she is a member of Capital City Writers and the Women’s Fiction Writers Association and is former features editor of WFWA’s Write On! magazine. She lives in Lansing, Michigan, with her husband, Zachary, and their son, Calvin, and can be found online at www.erinbartels.com. We Hope for Better Things is her first novel.Bartels_Erin

Getting to know Lady Margaret from The English Proposal, The French Encounter and The American Conquest by Jenna Brandt

WTTHS coversWhat do you want? I want to find peace and live a happy life.

Okay, but what do you really want? *Lady Margaret lets out a heavy sigh* It’s been hard; I’ve faced difficulties in my life that have changed what I’ve wanted in life. Safety is what I desire most. I want to keep my family safe and not be afraid anymore.

But what do you REALLY want? *Narrows her eyes into a glare, then blurts out* I want to stop making impulsive decisions that ruin my life.

What does the Viscount Rolantry offer you? Friendship. We grew up together. I care deeply for him.

What about the Vidame of Demoulin? Protection. Though he wishes for more, I cannot give it to him.

And what about Cort Westcott? A future. He rescued me in more ways than I can ever express.

And what about the Duke of Witherton? *She stands up and places her hands on her hips* He is a vile, awful man whom I refuse to talk about. If you bring him up again, I will leave and answer no more questions.

I’m sorry. I knew you had a troubled past with the duke, but I didn’t know to what extent. Let’s talk about something else. What things do you not like to do? *Reluctantly, she sits back down* I don’t like sitting still. Why is that? When I do, I have to think about the choices I have made and what happened because of them. I would rather stay busy than take stock of my life.

Tell us about a time when things didn’t go the way you wanted. I mentioned I lost people. The list is so long, I had no idea one person could survive such tremendous loss. The list started with my mother though, who passed away in childbirth. Delivering twins and surviving was not in the cards for her. What did you learn from growing up without a mother? What a deeply personal, and rather rude, question. *Lady Margaret pauses several seconds before answering* I learned that the love of a father could be enough. The Earl was a wonderful parent to me, especially after the loss of my twin brother, Randall, when we were children.

Thank you for your time, Lady Margaret. It’s been a pleasure. 

The Window to the Heart Saga Trilogy: a recountal of the trials, adventures and relationships of the family and friends of Lady Margaret. The first three books detail her journey with compelling themes of love, faith and hope with each book having a happy ending. Purchase it now on Amazon or read it for free in KU. 

Jenna headshotJenna Brandt is an avid reader and loves to read as well as write. She enjoys sharing the stories that she comes up with in her head. She has a BA in English from Bethany College, volunteers at her church on First Impressions as well as the creative writing team. She is a mother of three daughters and one little boy and a wife to a retired police officer.

To find out more about Jenna, to sign-up for her newsletter, or to purchase her books, visit her website at http://www.jennabrandt.com

Her reader’s club: https://www.facebook.com/groups/844819802336835/

The Lawkeepers’ reader’s group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/430422374043418/

Her books on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Jenna-Brandt/e/B0711MSFXW/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1497269877&sr=8-1

Like her on Facebook www.facebook.com/JennaBrandtAuthor

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Please Welcome Christian Hundley, Lord Easton from Miss Devon’s Choice by Sally Britton

Miss Devon FRONT COVERTell me about your parents. Deceased. My mother was an Italian merchant’s daughter, my father an English lord.

Where have you lived? Italy, England

What is your Job? Viscount, Heir to the Earl of Ivyford

Is marriage in the cards for you? Arranged marriage to Miss Rebecca Devon

Tell me about you friends. At present, though it is difficult to admit, my only companion is my Vizsla, Ajax.

Overall outlook on life. Duty to the family name comes before all else, and sentiment of any sort is dangerous to one’s well-being.

Do you like yourself? At times. As I keep my own company, I find I like myself better than I like most other people.

What, if anything, would you like to change about your life? If I could have prevented smallpox from infecting myself, and my mother, I would. Then she would be alive, my father likely would too, and I might’ve stayed in Italy with them both.

How are you viewed by others? As a scarred, withdrawn, half-breed Italian. They underestimate me. One day, they will all see what I am capable of.

What do you think of your physical appearance? I tower over most Englishmen, which doesn’t help when I desire to go unnoticed in crowds. I have my mother’s dark coloring, and the scars from the disease which claimed her life. High cheekbones, brown eyes. Nothing extraordinary, in my opinion. But a certain young lady has claimed she finds me handsome.

What do people think of your voice? Deep. Bass. Is this even a question? What does it matter?

What are your Strongest and weakest character traits? I am a man of honor, a man of my word. I keep myself closed to others. Exposing my weaknesses in the past resulted in physical and emotional pain. People do not tend to enjoy being around those who are different.

How much self-control do you have? Rather a great deal. Except, it seems, when Miss Devon stubbornly engages me in conversation about our future. She somehow brings out aspects of my personality I’ve tried to keep buried. How does she manage to do that?

What is your biggest fear? Losing someone I love. I’ve been through that too many times already. It’s easier to put away the ridiculous emotion than risk that kind of pain again.

Do you have any talents? I am a talented musician, though it’s something my grandfather wouldn’t have me advertise. A violin tucked beneath my chin puts me at ease. I also enjoy rowing. At university, it was a sport I competed in. I find it relaxes me to row until my arms ache.

What do people like best about you? I haven’t the faintest idea. As I haven’t a high opinion of many people, I imagine very few even bother to consider my character. But then, I suppose my betrothed has said – and who knows what inspired the idea – that I make her feel safe. Strange.

What interests you? My music keeps me interested, but I am finding an increased desire to become involved in politics. As I will one day sit in the House of Lords, I often study current events, the MPs, and I have been following the reports on the war carefully.

What books do you enjoy? Reading is one of my favorite entertainments. I’ve enjoyed Sir Walter Scott’s adventure novels, but I’ve taken to reading a novel Miss Devon enjoys, Mansfield Park. I admit, the author’s writing shows some talent, but I much prefer something less domestic.

What would a great gift for you be? Peace and quiet. Please.

When are you happy? When I’m playing my music, or out with Ajax. I’m not sure happy would be the correct word. I am content.

What makes you angry? Arrogant Englishmen behaving as if they are the only creatures on earth with half a brain. Imbeciles.

What makes you sad? Nothing. I have long since abandoned such a useless emotion.

What makes you laugh? An insipid question. I cannot think when—oh. I suppose Miss Devon made me laugh just the other day. I cannot think when, before…. She has an infectious laugh.

What are your hopes and dreams? To return to Italy one day, see my family there. I miss them. And to perhaps create an amiable match with my betrothed.

What has been the biggest trauma in your life? I was only a child when my mother died, following my illness. All I can remember from those last days with her was pain, the fevers, nightmares. The only thing that helped, that soothed me, was the sound of her voice singing Italian lullabies. And then she grew too ill. And she was gone.

What do you care about most in the world? Upholding the family honor. What else is there?

Do you have a secret? Having a secret would imply I care what people think of me. Although. Miss Devon has been something of a surprise. I’ve written my grandfather about the suitability of the match. I’m not certain this is going to work between us.

What do you like best about the other main characters in your book? That would be Miss Devon, I suppose. She’s an intelligent young woman. I suppose some would say attractive. She laughs and is one of the most cheerful people I’ve ever met. I find it hard to imagine her happy living in my grandfather’s house. She’s kind to everyone around her. She is unfailingly honest. I admire that. So many women of the tonare secretive, or say one thing and mean another. I suppose Miss Devon has many fine qualities. Hm.

Get Miss Devon’s Choice on Amazon Now

Miss Devon’s Choice: Rebecca Devon lives under the severe eye of her aunt and the iron will of her father. Though she wears what she is told and befriends the people they choose for her, she spends every moment longing to do as she wishes. Knowing freedom will only come through marriage, her hopes for a happy union are stolen away when her father arranges her marriage to a complete stranger.

Christian Hundley, Lord Easton, has learned the hard way that English society won’t accept a person who looks or behaves differently than their ideal. He has hidden himself away from scornful eyes for years, until his aging grandfather takes matters in hand and finds Christian a bride. Knowing he must agree to the marriage, Christian shields his heart. If the whole of society cannot accept him, why should his bride?

Rebecca knows she must have love in her life, but Christian is convinced there is nothing so fraught with danger and pain as entrusting one’s heart to another. Rebecca does everything she can to change his mind, but Christian is determined to remain aloof. Can an arranged marriage ever be anything other than a business partnership?

Purchase Miss Devon’s Choice on Amazon

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Sally Britton is sixth generation Texan, received her BA in English from Brigham Young University, and reads voraciously. She started her writing journey at the tender age of fourteen on an electric typewriter, and she’s never looked back.

Sally lives in Arizona with her husband, four children, and their dog. She loves researching, hiking, and eating too much chocolate.

 

 

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/SallysSweetRomanceFans/

BookBub Profile: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/sally-britton

Webpage: http://www.authorsallybritton.com

 

 

Introducing Abigail Larsen and Levi Emerson from Lawfully Wanted by Jenna Brandt

Lawfully-Wanted-GenericIf you had a free day with no responsibilities and your only mission was to enjoy yourself, what would you do?

Levi: I would want to spend it with Abigail. I don’t care what we do as long as we are together.

Abigail: You’re sweet, Levi. (She says turning to him). I would want to spend the day with you too. Maybe, go on a picnic.

What impression do you make on people when they first meet you?

Abigail: More open now. The old me before I went away to school didn’t stand up for myself, but the new me shares my thoughts more openly.

Levi: Probably stand-offish, but it’s mostly because of the job. I have to keep myself closed-off as a bounty hunter and always on alert.

What’s your idea of a good marriage?

Abigail: I never really wanted to get married–I don’t want a man to tell me what to do, but a good marriage for me would mean my spouse treats me as his equal.

Levi: What she said (He says with a crooked grin)

What are you most proud of about your life?

Abigail: I try to be a compassionate person and help others.

Levi: I’m loyal.

Is there anything you’ve always wanted to do but haven’t done?

Abigail: I would love to start my own local chapter for the Women’s Suffrage Movement.

Levi: I’m pretty happy with my new life in Rockwood Springs. I can’t think of anything.

What’s the worst thing that’s happened in your life? What did you learn from it?

Abigail: When my mother died, my father sent me away. I needed to be close to family, but instead ended up alone. It did make me stronger though.

Levi: Feeling I had to lie to Abigail. I didn’t realize the consequences it would have.

What are you most afraid of?

Abigail: Disappointing my father

Levi: Losing Abigail

What would you like it to say on your tombstone?

Abigail: She cared about others deeply and fought for what she believed in.

Levi: He was a good man who served God and those he loved.

If you would like to get this book for $2.99 or any of Jenna Brandt’s other books, you can visit Jenna Brandt on Amazon

13177985_10206441133811000_1529186980204341074_nAuthor Bio: Jenna Brandt is an international bestselling author who writes Christian historical and contemporary romance. Her historical books span from Victorian to Western to WWI eras and all her books have elements of romance, suspense and faith. Her debut series, the Window to the Heart Saga, as well as her multi-author series, The Lawkeepers and Match Made in Heaven Series, have garnered praise and love from readers.

She has been an avid reader since she could hold a book and started writing stories almost as early. She has been published in several newspapers as well as edited for multiple papers. She graduated with her Bachelor of Arts in English from Bethany College and was the Editor-in-Chief of the newspaper while there. Her first blog was published on Yahoo Parenting and The Grief Toolbox as well as featured on the ABC News, CNN Health, and Good Morning America websites. She is a contributor and curator for the website, Novel PASTimes, and a member of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW).

Writing is her passion, but she also enjoys cooking, watching movies, reading, engaging in social media and spending time with her three young daughters and husband where they live in the Central Valley of California. She is also active in her local church where she volunteers on their first impressions team, in the crisis care ministry as well as writes for the church’s creative team.

To find out more about Jenna, to sign-up for her newsletter, or to purchase her books, visit her website at http://www.jennabrandt.com

Her reader’s club: https://www.facebook.com/groups/844819802336835/

The Lawkeepers’ reader’s group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/430422374043418/

Her books on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Jenna-Brandt/e/B0711MSFXW/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1497269877&sr=8-1

Like her on Facebook www.facebook.com/JennaBrandtAuthor

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Look her up on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16847426.Jenna_Brandt

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Meet Mary Coffin Starbuck from Suzanne Woods Fisher’s The Light Before Day

Name: Mary Coffin Starbuck

Parents: Tristram and Dionis Coffin 

Siblings: Too many to keep track of!  

Places lived: Moved to Nantucket Island in 1660

Jobs: Wife, mother, ran a trading store for most of my life

Friends: Everyone I met 

Enemies: None that I know of, or care to know of

Dating, marriage: Married Nathaniel Starbuck when I was 17 years old; he is the love of my life 

Children: Ten children, eight of whom lived to adulthood

What person do you most admire? Peter Foulger—a true Renaissance man

Overall outlook on life: Optimistic and realistic, both

Do you like yourself? I am both content and grateful

What, if anything, would you like to change about your life? Other than losing two children to an early grave, there is nothing I lack 

How are you viewed by others? A curious question! John Richardson, an early Quaker preacher said of me, “The Islanders established her a Judge among them, for a little of moment was done without her advice.” 

Physical appearance: Small but mighty

Eyes: Brown

Hair: Once brunette, now salt and pepper

Voice: Gentle in tone, forceful in content

How would you describe yourself? As a woman who has been fortunate to find an important role to play in a man’s world  

Characteristics: Intelligent, logical; some say blessed with wisdom 

Strongest/weakest character traits: It is both—my ability to see what needs to change, and my tolerance in allowing time for change to occur

How much self-control do you have? More with every passing year

Fears: Standing at the grave of one I dearly love and facing life without them

Collections, talents: I have a quick mind for details and accounting

What people like best about you: Friends kindly refer to me as the Deborah of Nantucket

Food, drink: Mullein tea on a cold foggy Nantucket day

Books: The Bible, of course; books are scarce on an island 

Best way to spend a weekend: The same way as every other day

What would a great gift for you be? To have all my children together, under one roof…and all their children, too

When are you happy? Every single day brings a moment of joy

What makes you angry? Mistreatment of those who are less fortunate

What makes you sad? Same as what makes me angry

What makes you laugh? Little children, baby animals…oh, and my husband Nathaniel makes me laugh

Hopes and dreams:For our island to have unity, without oppression (remember, we came from the mainland, where the Puritans fined us for every little infraction)

What’s the worst thing you have ever done to someone and why? While still on the mainland, I stood by and watched friends and neighbors hurl rocks and stones at a Quaker woman 

Greatest success: When Quaker missionary John Richardson came to Nantucket in 1701 and I had a spiritual awakening

Biggest trauma: Burying two of my dear children

What do you care about most in the world?My family, my island, my faith

Do you have a secret? Oh my! There are no secrets on an island

What do you like best about the other main characters in your book?Well, they’re all my great great granddaughters!

What do you like least about the other main characters in your book? Absolutely nothing

If you could do one thing and succeed at it, what would it be:To end my life well

Most embarrassing thing that ever happened to you: Here is an example, taken straight from my journal: 

Stephen Hussey came into the store this afternoon. He settled into Father’s rocking chair by the fire and drank gallons of my mullein tea, talking to every person who came in. He carried his ear trumpet with him, which struck me as ironic for, despite being a Quaker, he is not fond of listening, only of talking. Stephen Hussey never had a thought that he couldn’t turn into a sermon. 

            Today, though, he remained quiet until the store was brimming over with customers. He rose to his feet and announced in his loud shrill voice, “I have a riddle for thee, Mary!”

The store grew quiet, all eyes turned to Stephen, as everyone enjoyed a good riddle, and he enjoyed a good audience.

“What’s gray and old and likes to be everywhere at once?”

“Nantucket fog,” I said, hoping he would now go home. 

“Nay. The answer is…Mary Coffin Starbuck!” He laughed and laughed, thoroughly amused with himself, until tears ran down his cheeks.That man! He sorely tries my patience.

Thanks for allowing this peek into your story, Mary!


Suzanne Woods Fisher
is an award-winning, bestselling author of more than two dozen novels, including Phoebe’s LightMinding the Light, the Amish Beginnings series, The Bishop’s Family series, and The Inn at Eagle Hill series, as well as nonfiction books about the Amish, including Amish Peaceand The Heart of the Amish. She lives in California. Learn more at http://www.suzannewoodsfisher.com and follow Suzanne on Twitter @suzannewfisher and Facebook at SuzanneWoodsFisherAuthor.